Social: Why Our Brains Are Wired to Connect

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Crown #ad - We are profoundly social creatures--more than we know. In social, more basic, renowned psychologist Matthew Lieberman explores groundbreaking research in social neuroscience revealing that our need to connect with other people is even more fundamental, than our need for food or shelter. Because of this, our brain uses its spare time to learn about the social world--other people and our relation to them.

. Based on the latest cutting edge research, the findings in Social have important real-world implications. Our schools and businesses, for example, attempt to minimalize social distractions. But this is exactly the wrong thing to do to encourage engagement and learning, and literally shuts down the social brain, leaving powerful neuro-cognitive resources untapped.

The insights revealed in this pioneering book suggest ways to improve learning in schools, make the workplace more productive, and improve our overall well-being. Social argues that our need to reach out to and connect with others is a primary driver behind our behavior. We believe that pain and pleasure alone guide our actions.

Social: Why Our Brains Are Wired to Connect #ad - Yet, new research using fmri--including a great deal of original research conducted by Lieberman and his UCLA lab--shows that our brains react to social pain and pleasure in much the same way as they do to physical pain and pleasure. Fortunately, the brain has evolved sophisticated mechanisms for securing our place in the social world.

We have a unique ability to read other people’s minds, fears, and motivations, to figure out their hopes, allowing us to effectively coordinate our lives with one another.

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Being Wrong: Adventures in the Margin of Error

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HarperCollins e-books #ad - Guiding the reader through the history and psychology of error, from Socrates to Alan Greenspan, both of the mammoth and daily variety, Being Wrong will change the way you perceive screw-ups, forever. Both wise and clever, full of fun and surprise about a topic so central to our lives that we almost never even think about it.

Being Wrong: Adventures in the Margin of Error #ad - Bill mckibben, an illuminating exploration of what it means to be in error, author of Earth: Making a Life on a Tough New PlanetIn the tradition of The Wisdom of Crowds and Predictably Irrational comes Being Wrong, and why homo sapiens tend to tacitly assume or loudly insist that they are right about most everything.

. Kathryn schulz, editor of Grist magazine, argues that error is the fundamental human condition and should be celebrated as such.

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The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less, Revised Edition

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HarperCollins e-books #ad - He offers eleven practical steps on how to limit choices to a manageable number, have the discipline to focus on those that are important and ignore the rest, and ultimately derive greater satisfaction from the choices you have to make. In accessible, schwartz shows how the dramatic explosion in choice—from the mundane to the profound challenges of balancing career, engaging, family, and anecdotal prose, and individual needs—has paradoxically become a problem instead of a solution.

. Schwartz also shows how our obsession with choice encourages us to seek that which makes us feel worse. By synthesizing current research in the social sciences, anxiety, Schwartz makes the counter intuitive case that eliminating choices can greatly reduce the stress, and busyness of our lives. Whether we're buying a pair of jeans, selecting a long-distance carrier, applying to college, or setting up a 401k, ordering a cup of coffee, choosing a doctor, everyday decisions—both big and small—have become increasingly complex due to the overwhelming abundance of choice with which we are presented.

As americans, we assume that more choice means better options and greater satisfaction. But beware of excessive choice: choice overload can make you question the decisions you make before you even make them, it can set you up for unrealistically high expectations, and it can make you blame yourself for any and all failures.

The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less, Revised Edition #ad - And, in a culture that tells us that there is no excuse for falling short of perfection when your options are limitless, too much choice can lead to clinical depression. In the paradox of choice, barry schwartz explains at what point choice—the hallmark of individual freedom and self-determination that we so cherish—becomes detrimental to our psychological and emotional well-being.

In the long run, this can lead to decision-making paralysis, anxiety, and perpetual stress.

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Social Intelligence: The New Science of Human Relationships

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Bantam #ad - Now, daniel goleman has written a groundbreaking synthesis of the latest findings in biology and brain science, once again, revealing that we are “wired to connect” and the surprisingly deep impact of our relationships on every aspect of our lives. Far more than we are consciously aware, our daily encounters with parents, bosses, spouses, and even strangers shape our brains and affect cells throughout our bodies—down to the level of our genes—for good or ill.

In social intelligence, Daniel Goleman explores an emerging new science with startling implications for our interpersonal world. Its most fundamental discovery: we are designed for sociability, constantly engaged in a “neural ballet” that connects us brain to brain with those around us. Our reactions to others, sending out cascades of hormones that regulate everything from our hearts to our immune systems, have a far-reaching biological impact, and theirs to us, making good relationships act like vitamins—and bad relationships like poisons.

Social Intelligence: The New Science of Human Relationships #ad - Emotional intelligence was an international phenomenon, appearing on the New York Times bestseller list for over a year and selling more than five million copies worldwide. And goleman delivers his most heartening news with powerful conviction: we humans have a built-in bias toward empathy, cooperation, and altruism–provided we develop the social intelligence to nurture these capacities in ourselves and others.

He describes the “dark side” of social intelligence, from narcissism to Machiavellianism and psychopathy. We can “catch” other people’s emotions the way we catch a cold, and the consequences of isolation or relentless social stress can be life-shortening. He also reveals our astonishing capacity for “mindsight, ” as well as the tragedy of those, like autistic children, whose mindsight is impaired.

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Human: The Science Behind What Makes Your Brain Unique

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HarperCollins e-books #ad - What happened along the evolutionary trail that made humans so unique? In his accessible style, Michael Gazzaniga pinpoints the change that made us thinking, sentient humans different from our predecessors. He explores what makes human brains special, the nature of human consciousness, the importance of language and art in defining the human condition, and even artificial intelligence.

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Prime Mover: A Natural History of Muscle

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W. W. Norton & Company #ad - The story—and the science—of nature's greatest engine. Whether we blink an eye, walk, run, or merely breathe, lift a finger, throw a spear or a ball, we are using muscle. His talents as both scientist and writer shine in this masterful narrative of biological ingenuity, as he relates the story—and science—of nature's greatest engine.

Prime Mover: A Natural History of Muscle #ad - Those of us who are right-handed can tighten screws and jar lids more forcibly than we can loosen them. Although muscles differ little in appearance and performance across the animal kingdom, they accomplish tasks as diverse as making flies fly, rattlesnakes rattle, and squid shoot their tentacles. Our everyday activities turn on the performance of nature's main engine: we may breathe harder going uphill, but we put more strain on our muscles walking downhill.

. Here we're treated to the story of how form and performance make these things happen—how nature does her work. Steven vogel is a leader in the great new field of bioengineering, which is rapidly explaining the beauty and efficiency of nature.

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A Brief History of Creation: Science and the Search for the Origin of Life

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W. W. Norton & Company #ad - A Brief History of Creation: Science and the Search for the Origin of Life #ad - James cleaves ii seek to answer the most crucial question in science: How did life begin? They trace the trials and triumphs of the iconoclastic scientists who have sought to solve the mystery, from Darwin’s theory of evolution to Crick and Watson’s unveiling of DNA. The epic story of the scientists through the ages who have sought answers to life’s biggest mystery: How did it begin?In this essential and illuminating history of Western science, Bill Mesler and H.

This fascinating exploration not only examines the origin-of-life question, but also interrogates the very nature of scientific discovery and objectivity.

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Human Universe

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William Collins #ad - With groundbreaking insight it reveals how time, physics and chemistry came together to create a creature that can wonder at its own existence, but how it can think, blessed with an unquenchable thirst to discover not just where it came from, where it is going and if it is alone. Accompanies the acclaimed BBC TV series.

Top ten sunday times bestseller‘engaging, ambitious and creative’ guardianWhere are we? Are we alone? Who are we? Why are we here? What is our future?Human Universe tackles some of the greatest questions that humans have asked to try and understand the very nature of ourselves and the Universe in which we live.

Human Universe #ad - Through the endless leaps of human minds, it explores the extraordinary depth of our knowledge today and where our curiosity may lead us in the future.

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The Stuff of Thought: Language as a Window into Human Nature

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Penguin Books #ad - In the stuff of thought, Pinker presents a fascinating look at how our words explain our nature. This new york times bestseller is an exciting and fearless investigation of language from the author of Better Angels of Our Nature and The Sense of Style and Enlightenment Now. Curious, fearless, inventive, naughty.

The new york times book review bestselling author Steven Pinker possesses that rare combination of scientific aptitude and verbal eloquence that enables him to provide lucid explanations of deep and powerful ideas. His previous books - including the pulitzer Prize finalist The Blank Slate - have catapulted him into the limelight as one of today's most important popular science writers.

The Stuff of Thought: Language as a Window into Human Nature #ad - Considering scientific questions with examples from everyday life, The Stuff of Thought is a brilliantly crafted and highly readable work that will appeal to fans of everything from The Selfish Gene and Blink to Eats, Shoots & Leaves.

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Synaptic Self: How Our Brains Become Who We Are

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Penguin Books #ad - Exploring the functioning of memory, and the mechanism of self-awareness, the synaptic basis of mental illness and drug addiction, Synaptic Self is a provocative and mind-expanding work that is destined to become a classic. In 1996 joseph ledoux's the emotional Brain presented a revelatory examination of the biological bases of our emotions and memories.

Synaptic Self: How Our Brains Become Who We Are #ad - Synapses encode the essence of personality, enabling each of us to function as a distinctive, integrated individual from moment to moment. Now, the world-renowned expert on the brain has produced with a groundbreaking work that tells a more profound story: how the little spaces between the neurons—the brain's synapses—are the channels through which we think, act, imagine, feel, and remember.

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The Social Animal: The Hidden Sources of Love, Character, and Achievement

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Random House #ad - Drawing on a wealth of current research from numerous disciplines, it turns out, but a creative one, vestigial place, illustrating a fundamental new understanding of human nature along the way: The unconscious mind, Brooks takes Harold and Erica from infancy to old age, is not a dark, where most of the brain’s work gets done.

He demolishes conventional definitions of success and looks toward a culture based on trust and humility. Brooks reveals the deeply social aspect of our minds and exposes the bias in modern culture that overemphasizes rationalism, individualism, and IQ. 1 new york times bestsellerwith unequaled insight and brio, New York Times columnist David Brooks has long explored and explained the way we live.

The Social Animal: The Hidden Sources of Love, Character, and Achievement #ad - This is the story of how success happens, told through the lives of one composite American couple, Harold and Erica. Now brooks turns to the building blocks of human flourishing in a multilayered, profoundly illuminating work grounded in everyday life. The social animal is a moving intellectual adventure, a story of achievement and a defense of progress.

This is the realm where character is formed and where our most important life decisions are made—the natural habitat of The Social Animal. It is an essential book for our time—one that will have broad social impact and will change the way we see ourselves and the world.

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